Embracing Reality

We did not choose where we were born or the body, brain, and parents that came with our birth into this world. In the context of our subjective reality we have no choice, our choices are made based on the circumstances that are thrust upon us which we have no control over. Random is simply ignorance of the variables involved and we can deduce from this that physical reality is completely controlled externally.

The concept that we have no choice is deplorable because in the absence of choice there is no reason for survival. Since everything is a sequence of events this means that everything happens for a reason and there must be a greater meaning to survival; this in turn means there is a reason for choice but since choice is non-existent in our reality the only explanation is that choices are made externally to us.

1. Choice circumstance
2. Circumstances determine survival
3. Survival has a reason
4. Therefore circumstance has a reason

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Embracing Reality

  1. godseek

    Basic laws of physics state that an object at rest will stay at rest, and that an object in motion will stay in motion, unless acted upon by an outside force. For sake of explanation “object” means the greater scope of a person’s reality. Of course, there dimensions of reality which we are unable to control (yet) such as the passing of time, natural disasters, existence of matter, etc.
    In our life paths, choices are made to change our circumstances. While there is much we can only try to act on, there is plenty which we are able to act on. And, although those uncontrollable dimensions may be working against us, our choices are made in hopes of working around them.
    We can choose how we react to those uncontrollable dimensions. We can accept that a tornado is about to flatten our house, but we can choose to go down to the cellar and cover our heads.

    Reply
  2. The Setta

    I agree with godseek. We do have choice. We can create circumstances through our choices. If you choose to board a bus you will get to sit on a bus seat if you choose to take a taxi you will sit on a different kind of seat. Our choices however are limited to our knowledge. The circumstances that are thrust upon us are avoidable if we have knowledge of the sequence of actions that can lead us to them. We hence choose with and without knowledge.

    Reply
    1. Jonathan Wagner Post author

      What we perceive as choice is really based on a logical history that we have developed. Take any choice that you could make and then figure out why you made it. In the purest you could say it was a logical decision, but that logic is derived through education, the education you received is through circumstance.

      If you were born in a different location and faced with the same choice your past experience you had in the different location would affect the outcome of your choice, so your choice is highly influenced, if not completely influenced by environmental history.

      Most people will lack the capability to truly embrace this concept because it is so psychologically jarring at first since we need to believe, in selfishness, that everything we do we are in control of. Even if we are a series of complex reactions our brains will tell us otherwise to make sure we continue to function.

      Also you can never avoid a circumstance, it is a logical impossibility. You could attempt to avoid future outcomes/circumstance but when something happens you can’t make it no longer not happen because we are incapable of time travel.

      Reply
      1. The Setta

        So in other words what you are saying is that we are simply pieces in a scheme of circumstances and we are controlled by forces within this scheme. That we are all incapable of choosing because we are constants subjected to the instructions of our genetic make-up and experiential acquisition of knowledge. Hmmn. Does this mean that morality as well is but a product of environmental conditioning?

      2. Jonathan Wagner Post author

        Your summation is pretty accurate but it is a bit of a leap to say that morality is the product of conditioning. There are guiding principals, rules, and forces that guide the entire universe. When you’re talking about good and evil you’re talking about want. Everything, and I mean everything, we consider to be evil derives from want, how we go about obtaining the things we want is how something gets slotted into either good or evil. In reality evil is simply a means which ultimately has a negative outcome on human survival. This is why everyone is generally good and good prevails because evil is not conducive to long-term survival.

        Now this applies to big things, like murder, but what about running a red light? Something like traffic laws are definitely conditioning, but their reasons for existing are linked up to real implications such as getting into an accident and causing death. If there are no survival implications of a ‘moral’ rule it is usually not upheld or disregarded (see my post on piracy). The only value to evil is personal gain but because of its implications it could end up putting you into a greater situation of lack making evil acts not only pointless but futile in most, but not all, cases.

        Keep in mind that while objectively it will appear as if we have no choice (most religious people actually think God knows all variables and therefore knows what we will do next anyways) Subjectively we do have choice. If right now I asked you what do you want to do in the next 5 minutes? Not only did you not know I was going to ask you about it, but you also didn’t know you were going to have to make a choice and that choice is still decided by you subjectively. So rather our personal ignorance in what we are going to choose is what gives choice value.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s